Tag Archives: culture

Reading List (25/4)

Canterbury

On book hoarding. I am very familiar with this problem. At present, there is a stack of unread books by my bedside and more mounting on the shelf in our bedroom. So many lovely books.

Pistachio cake.

Has the wellbeing cure gotten to individualistic? Should we be looking for ways to build community, rather than focusing on our individual wellbeing as the world burns?

Anna Jones’ recommendations for food and coffee in London.

Advice on getting rest (and why you should do this).

Food in books.

Spring pasta ideas.

Spring

Have a good week! x

 

Reading List (18/4)

Sea view Skye

I have been away this past week so I don’t actually have a very long list. (And this is also why I am publishing this so late today!) I’ve read a few things on The Guardian and The New York Times but I’ve mainly been reading a book called An Enchanted April, which I have just loved. It is, quite frankly, an enchanting read. (See what I did there?) The story has made me smile, sigh, and wish for Italy in springtime. I have loved the writing enough to seek out another of her books – Elizabeth and her German garden – to read this week.

Kitchen envy.

Christiane Amanpour’s favourite books.

It’s all about sleep people. As someone who loves to sleep, and is appreciative of at least 9 hours a night, I am all for this trend.

A new exhibition at MoMA on women artists.

I want to read this book. A review of Tartine All Day, yet another cookbook I want to read.

Oatmeal fudge bars. Please. Also, these almond cookies.

Have a good week! x

Reading List (11/4)

PhDs and mental health.

Cynthia Nixon reading Emily Dickinson.

Easter and Passover ideas for feasting from Ottolenghi.

Easter baking. That chocolate pistachio cake. My god.

On creativity.

A disappointing restaurant experience in Paris.

Bunnies!

Cookbooks from chefs.

Apple beignets. This just reminds me of the Princess and the Frog.

We’re currently on the Isle of Skye for the week. I am reading Spinster: Making a Life of One’s Own which I am loving. (Thanks WhatsApp bookclub!) It is all about living along as a woman in the modern world, written by someone who has five female writer gurus. In essence, it is about how to live a good life, alone.

 

Reading List (4/4)

Spring bulbs

Hello April! It has felt very much like spring the last few days. It has been more sunny than not. It is warmish during the day (although still quite cold in the evenings). And the days are long! It is light when I need to get up and stays light so far into the evening that we have been eating dinner after 8pm. Spring and autumn are truly my two favourite months but spring might just win out. I love the light. The blossom on the trees and bulbs flowering on every street corner. I love the warmth.

Blossom

Words of advice from female chefs.

Cooking and the senses.

Learning to make stone tools, and understanding prehistory.

Claiming back religious traditions, through food.

For Mom: Anna Wintour’s Wild Garden. I love this garden. I love the wistful meadows and rambling roses. And the colours. I think it would be rather wonderful to spend a summers day meandering until slightly lost, lay a rug and read a book in parts of this garden.

I baked this weekend. For the first time in ages. I made an orange almond cake that walks the tightrope between a cake and a pudding. It is very bitter so I find it best served with yoghurt and a little honey. Good for breakfast too.

Orange almond cake

Fairytales.

McDonald’s is switching to fresh beef.

For when you are in need of perspective: a video of the known universe.

Food writing for everyone.

I’m still obsessively listening to Elly Griffiths’ Ruth Galloway series. I find Ruth is like an old friend and I’m catching up on her life. I particularly love listening to these books on lazy weekends, when I’m pottering about the house. I can knit, bake and hang up washing all whilst on the Norfolk salt marshes, solving mysteries. I’ve read these out-of-order because I started in the middle reading books 6 and 7 first and have now gone back to read 1, 2 and 3 in quick succession….

Have a good week! x

Reading List (28/2)

Last day in February! Anyone else freaking out?

milk-honey-ice-cream-rye-cookie

A seriously innovative and dare I say it, cool way to present a PhD thesis.

Pistachio cream doughnuts. Like, I’ve always thought doughnuts too much of a faff to make at home (and when I’m in need of a fix I get some from Small Food Bakery instead) but for these I might change my mind.

Myths of academia and life post-PhD. A PhD who works in a chocolate factory.

Cities and green space.

I need to plan another trip to Paris. Soon.

Animal album covers.

Food and Brexit.

On bread and wheat.

I discovered Elly Griffiths by accident – through a bookshop newsletter. I then found her in my library’s audio app and listened to The Ghost Fields over the weekend. It was great, all windswept Norfolk beaches, archaeological mysteries and dysfunctional detectives. What’s not to love? I’ve already downloaded another that I’m listening to on the train in the morning.

Have a good week! x

 

Reading List (21/2)

 

russian-honey-cake

Blackberries (for those of you in the South).

On the pending apocalypse and society’s obsession with the end of the world.

Giving up a business at the peak of it’s success.

A response to those accusing us young’uns of wasting food because we like to take photographs of our meals. A new supermarket where you can pay what you want.

If you’re struggling to find new podcasts to listen to, Vogue has a list for you. (This is not me, by the way. I have so many and am addicted to so many, that I fear finding any more may actually tip me over an edge into the podcast unknown, where I will just listen to stories forever and ever, until I fade away from lack of nourishment).

Jay Rayner on what children should learn to cook.

Nancy Silverton! Swoon. How amazing is she? New chef crush. Watched the episode of her on Chef’s Table last night and am baking bread today. Possibly these things are related.

Mushroom hunting. Sounds like a fairly dangerous (although lucrative) past time to be honest.

Onion and cheese pie. Perfect for late winter dinners I think.

Albert Adria’s new restaurant in Barcelona.

Food and language. On using the word ‘interesting’, which I confess I use too much.

Protest, with food posters. And an interview about the collection.

Neil Gaiman reading a myth from his new book.

I love a crumble-tart – and this one, from Jeremy Lee, looks super.

This is an interesting read, about being a sober woman.

Farming and retirement.

Russian honey cake (pictured above). I was inspired to make this after watching Vladimir Mukhin’s episode on Chef’s Table. He serves his take on this cake alongside his grandmother’s version. Both looked divine so I tried my hand at it. It is sort-of-super-easy… (there are some quirks) but it tastes excellent. I have some ideas about how I might make it easier next time.

Have a good week! x

Reading List (14/2)

file-13-02-2017-18-31-39

On building communities, developing connections and participatory politics. Eating food, learning culture, developing empathy. The Boundless Kitchen in Denmark. Refugees making walnut baklava in NYC.

Children’s books for stressful times.

Mr Darcy wouldn’t have looked like Colin Firth. I’m okay with carrying on pretending he would have. Anyone else?

Breakfast rolls.

Should we consider veganism?

A history of Nutella.

Is the ‘Instagram generation’ wasting too much food?

Reuben Riffel.

Orchids in a museum exhibition.

Surf inspiration. And wilderness inspiration.

Ottolenghi in praise of dessert.

This.

Literary confession: I have never actually read Charles Dickens. I have listened to Neil Gaiman read A Christmas Carol, (which is a truly wonderful and magical way to spend a few Christmas hours) but that is as far as it goes. They just never grasped me the way other classics did. But maybe, given all the food references, I should give them a go again?

Building networks and community through gardens.

The logistics of school lunches in the US, and how to make them work so the food they produce for children to eat is better.

I listened to The Gospel According to Drew Barrymore over the weekend, while I baked a blood orange and poppyseed loaf. It was stellar fluffy storytelling about the lives of two friends that I thoroughly enjoyed. Now I’m listening to Black Widow and watching Endeavour, in an attempt at some kind of detective overload I think.

Also, it’s my birthday next week (Tuesday as it happens) and I’m freaking out about the potentiality of approaching my mid-thirties (not quite yet but imminently – is it time to get a five-year plan? Have I achieved enough? And so on and so forth. Anxiety at the ready, always.) So I’m super excited about the new season of Chef’s Table that arrives on Friday, which means I can spend Sunday diverting my attention to that rather than dwelling on my age. (On Friday evening and Saturday I am spending time with the Princess, looking at art and eating.)

Have a good week! x