Tag Archives: writing list

Reading List (17/10)

“When you are in the water you can think differently, because you feel the whole of the world in a way that you don’t when you’re outside. We’re held differently by the world and therefore we think differently.” I loved everything about this article.

Pestle and mortars.

Academic guilt.

I loved this portrait of Philip Pullman, about his upcoming Book of Dust.

This week I devoured Heartburn, by Nora Ephron. I really loved it because it is clearly the source of one of my favourite quotes (which I heard first in Julie and Julia). “What I love about cooking is that after a hard day, there is something comforting about the fact that if you melt butter and add flour and then hot stock, it will get thick! It’s a sure thing! It’s sure thing in a world where nothing is sure; it has a mathematical certainty in a world where those of us who long for some kind of certainty are forced to settle for crossword puzzles.” In Julie and Julia, she talks about whisking egg yolks into chocolate, and sugar and milk, while making pie, but really it amounts to the same thing. It is all about the comfort of routine in cooking.

I listened to I found my tribe. I urge you to read this book (or listen to it, as I did. It is read by the author). It tells the story of Ruth, who has a tribe of 5 children and a husband with Motor Neurone Disease. Her story of coping with her husband’s illness while raising her children is captivating, heartbreaking, and arresting. There is some wild sea swimming in cold Irish water for good measure too. This book will make you grateful for what you have.

For most of Sunday I listened to The Girls. I have been drawn into this novel, wanting to know how things will end (although you have a good idea from the beginning as it is based on the Manson murders ). But it is the dynamics between the girls, the way teenaged is represented, that is so fascinating.

I’m not even sure we should really know how to make this ourselves but oh well: how to make your own cookie butter.

Food critics at London’s newspapers.

I love the look of this cocktail, especially for Halloween.

That is all for this week! Have a good one y’ll. x

 

 

Reading List (19/9)

Hello again! I am back from my holiday in Spain, all rested and prepped for the coming academic year.

Chiclana sunset

Julia Child always reminded people to never apologise for the food you are serving. Even if it didn’t quite work out the way you wanted it to. They will never know that it is not how you anticipated it would be…

Swimming in the lochs in summer.

Things to make this week: plum tart, marbled banana bread, chocolate wheaty biscuits.

‘The traditionally low number of women in non-fiction, especially history, invites many questions about the kinds of discourse we consider useful or true’. You need to read this. It is a fascinating account of hierarchy, ideas, and who has the right to say certain things. It is necessary to know if we want to see more things by women writers.

On inconspicuous consumption.

Food writers who teach us how to live.

Over the holiday I finished two books. The first, Floating, is a(nother) swimming memoir. Joe Minihane, the author, follows in Roger Deakin’s Waterlog footsteps, swimming his way around Britain, finding all of Roger’s swimming spots in an attempt to quell his anxiety and help his depression. Joe writes: “Nestled deep in this Dartmoor valley, […] I remembered that true escape was the essence of wild swimming: escape from needless worries and anxieties, from fear, from being hassled“. I loved this book. It is honest about a struggle with mental health issues, and working to find various solutions to help them – be it swimming in the wild, or the community that develops around the swimming, or the meditation of swimming. Swimming memoirs have framed my year this year, and helped me encounter the water in a new way. (Including a fairly long swim at the weekend, in a lake where the water temperature was 15C!)

The second book I finished was actually a re-read of something I first read as an undergraduate, The Bone Woman. This is the story of a forensic anthropologist’s experiences of mass graves in Rwanda, Bosnia, and Kosovo. It makes for hard reading but I think it is important to find out about what happens to bring justice to families after a war.

Back-to-school food guide and a fall dinner guide.

If you read nothing else, read this Twitter exchange between the Natural History Museum and the Science Museum. Sheer brilliance.

That is it for this week chaps! Have a good one! x

Reading List (5/9)

Oh hello September, “season of mists and mellow fruitfulness”. Sorry, couldn’t help myself. Glorious crisp mornings. Frost. Changing leaf colours. This is my favourite time of year.

 

And appropriately, here is the first (of what will be many) lists of cookbooks that are coming out this autumn. Mostly I felt meh about this list, with a few notable exceptions (hello Modernist Bread, Mossimo Bottura, and Sweet by Ottolenghi and Goh).

A list of food studies journals.

Olia Hercules has a new cookbook out – Kaukasis. It looks beautiful.

On composting.

Feminist thrillers, with a contemplation on the roles of men/women in crime novels.

It is academic conference season. So this morning naturally I have read two different articles on the point of conferences, and the expense!

American diners.

Zero-waste supermarkets.

Finding your dream by reading Gourmet.

Ancestors.

Last week I attended a new community event: Walk Talk Notts. It is a group of people who gather on the last Wednesday of each month to walk and talk about things. It is generally sustainability related so last week we visited Hockley Homegrown. This husband/wife team grow a wide variety of unusual veggies right in the heart of the city. They work with local restaurants and cafes, as well as selling directly to people. The one garden site we visited was just lovely! (And super inspiring for ideas as I bring my allotment back from the wild!)

 

As I mentioned yesterday, in my 52 Weeks of Sourdough post, we visited Small Food Bakery on the weekend. While there, we ate their samples of pain au chocolat, all filled with different chocolates. (For the record SFB, my favourite was number 2!) They were delicious. And Green Haus had a pop-up shop in the bakery too so I may have purchased new house plants that are a delight.

 

Kitchen garden goals.

Really rather beautiful hotels, if money is no object. A girl can dream…

For Louisa, chicken-fried steak!!!

Nicole Krauss on her new book, Forest Dark. On my list of things to read.

Have a good week! x

Reading List (22/8)

Greetings from Copenhagen!

CPH

If movie directors made food films. Brilliant.

The comfort of tea rituals. I particularly love the description of office tea habits. Totally true!

Ice cream sodas. Personally, a cream soda float from Wimpy (particularly in the middle of a road trip) will always have my heart.

Remembering a friend with a coordinated dance in a pool.

Glorious old collections of wallpaper. (Thanks Jo for finding this!)

Aubergines, tomatoes, ricotta. Really the best things for a summer dinner. Or, this zucchini pasta.

Trends in grocery shopping and meal-making.

I do so love a rice krispie square.

A handmade Oreo.

Artisan food products, ‘craft culture‘, and race. You need to read this.

New book on Andalucia, from Elisabeth Luard.

With the new biography, there is a lot of writing about Patience Gray at the moment. (I picked up the TLS in the airport on Sunday and so read this too. You can read it online only if you’ve got a subscription.)

Slablova!

On eclipses.

It is no longer just about apple cider. And why you should add water to your whisky.

Last week I finished The Last Painting of Sarah de Vos. My sister and I read it almost simultaneously, and so shared thoughts about it on Saturday. We both enjoyed the story and the characters, but did think there would be more mystery and searching involved. I did wolf it down though, and particularly loved the character of Marty de Groot as an old man.

Have a good week! x

 

 

 

Reading List (1/8)

Well hello August, and welcome the month of (European) holidays. Pretty much everyone is on holiday at some point this month as the weather is at it’s potential best and schools are out. There is a slow atmosphere in the air, and the weather can be soporific. I am battling through this feeling though, trying to finish the book and taking advantage of not traveling (well, currently being unable to go very far anyway) by catching up on writing and transcribing. Towards the end of the month I am heading to Copenhagen for a week, to attend a conference. Suggestions of what to do while I am there are welcome!

A recipe for banana bread that uses dried figs. I am going to have to try this out.

Why you should visit Tiree, a Hebridean island. Scotchtastic crew take note!

I listened to Valeria Luiselli talk about her book on child refugees navigating arriving in the US without documents. It is a compelling listen, and a concerning topic.

This poem, by Maya Angelou.

Jay Rayner on food and the environment.

I seem to be in a memoir-reading phase. This weekend I’ve been reading Bleaker House. The story is about Nell Stevens (the author) attempting to write a novel so that she can proclaim to be a writer before she turns 30. She says in the book part of it is so she can have something to say at parties, when other people ask you what you do. (I know all about this feeling). But more importantly, she feels compelled to become a writer, to write a novel. She decides that loneliness and lack of distraction are key to the novel writing process and so goes to live on a Falkland Island for three months during the winter, when there is pretty much no one else there. The book is laugh-out-loud funny in parts, poignant in others, and deeply entertaining all the way through. It is easy to read over a weekend, or a few days, when you feel like disappearing into someone else’s world. You can find Nell talking about her book on the Shakespeare and Company podcast here.

Cultural appropriation?

Ideas on how gratitude may help boost your wellbeing. And a gratitude journal I really love.

Bread, butter, and honey is a great trinity.

Have a good week! x

Reading List (10/1)

blurred-lights

Re-reading books in times of stress. I so relate to this. I read hardly any new books during my final year as a PhD. I re-read (and listened to) a lot of Harry Potter, some Austen, some Bronte, The Secret Garden – pretty much anything that was easy and comforting.

Pasta with potatoes with cheese. Just what these dark January days need.

Ruby Tandoh on eating clean and dietary restrictions. And on white sliced bread.

Pete Wells on Locol. (This has caused a bit of a furore in the food world). A response to Pete Wells’ review of Locol.

This for dinner.

Celebrating the food of refugees.

Places to visit this year: from Buzzfeed, The Guardian, and the New York Times.

Lily Vanilli.

Bee Wilson on choosing books for awards.

Places to eat in foodie cities.

From the 1962 New Yorker: Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring. (Long, but worth the read.)

The making of roscón de reyes cakes for January 6th.

What is a PhD and what is the point of doing one?

Fantastic conversation between Krista Tippett and Maria Popova this week.

Running a whisky ‘dramathon‘. Any takers?

I was catching up on podcasts over the weekend. I loved the BBC Radio 4 Food Programme on cake, its popularity in modern times and its history. I’ve added Cake: A global history to my (long) list of books I want to read this year.

I also listened (with much delight and laughter) to Northanger Abbey by Val McDermid. The story of Cat Morland is transported to Edinburgh and the Scottish borders. I loved it. It was ridiculous with tinges of gothic and some fantastic vampire references.

On returning a Michelin star.

Meryl Streep at the Golden Globes.

Another review on a new book on the evils of sugar.

Tracing the history of plants and through that, the history of culture and food tradition.

An interview with the head chef of Petersham Nurseries (one of my favourite places ever).

Have a good week! x

Reading List (21/6)

A short but sweet (and quite late) list today. I’m just back from Spain, having avoided the internet (with the exception of some social media) for nearly a whole week.

2016-06-20 19.55.43-1

So I’ve read nothing except some interesting things on the Brexit referendum which is happening on Thursday (and had some interesting conversations with Europeans who cannot believe the British will vote to leave). Andrés and I have not really seriously discussed what will happen if the vote is for leave. But it will have implications for us both. I hope you are getting your vote on, if you can.

On the mistrust of science.

This. This is exactly the kind of teaching I want to do.

Totally want to make these lemon bars sometime soon.

Cooking from old, historical recipe books.

I read most of Like Water for Chocolate on the plane this morning. It is such a wonderful book, full of food and memory, sensuality and family life. Read it if you haven’t already.

I’m making this for dinner tonight, post netball match.

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